Throw Out Fifty Things

I am an ocd individual whose obsession drives her bananas! I am obsessed over the way people pepper their conversations with extra words, such as the one in my comment. Combine the bottles (into one). Some I hear on a daily basis are these: edit out, leave out (for going somewhere), combine together, added bonus, etc. Also, people in my area rearrange sentences: I ain't long been gone, or It came up a big storm. WHERE were these persons when proper English usage was taking place! Anyone out there care to comment?

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Gladys, I'm with you!! I can't read items without automatically proofreading them also. Our church bulletin is the worst. I can always spot errors. One of my pet peeves is like/lack. Is this a Southern problem only? I've heard "his-self" so much, I'll bet it's in the dictionary by now! We must stand up and talk like true educated persons and be correct role models for our children/grandchildren. Hang in there, sweetie!
Peggy
Gladys, as an Englisih major, I sympathize with you. But I'm guilty, too. I just used "edit out" the other day. I thought it sounded stronger than merely, "edit" - although you're right, it's redundant. I take a lot of liberties with my writing in order to make it more conversational. Hope you don't mind too much...
I understand the pet peeve - - how about this one? Hot Water Heater.
And does Hamburger Meat qualify? :-)
one my my major pet peeves is the use of the work 'nother'.
such as, 'that's a whole nother situation.'
haven't heard it? start listening for it. you'll hear more of it than you ever wanted to. they should try using the word "Other".

oh - and another one is the over use of the word 'actually'.
newscasters are really bad for this one ... somehow everything has to be the 'actual' person, place or thing that the situation actually happened at actually earlier that day to the people that were actually in the restaurant.
People around here also say "thow" for throw, "knowed" for knew. Imagine the culture shock of hearing for my first time, "Oh, I done been had that!" Here is another one: "I'm leaving out this morning."
A preacher often says "Pray for she and I." I automatically think in rules, so you know that one gets me!

Peggy Means said:
Gladys, I'm with you!! I can't read items without automatically proofreading them also. Our church bulletin is the worst. I can always spot errors. One of my pet peeves is like/lack. Is this a Southern problem only? I've heard "his-self" so much, I'll bet it's in the dictionary by now! We must stand up and talk like true educated persons and be correct role models for our children/grandchildren. Hang in there, sweetie!
Peggy
I never comment on these sorts of forums, but for some reason, this post really bothered me. I was directed to this site by a friend; I watched Gail's intro video and she seems inspiring and great -- I'm thinking maybe I'll check out her book. And then I click on some of the threads, which also seem thoughtful and inspiring... until I came across this one.

Gladys' "pet peeve" and the others who have chimed in with their own language pet peeves, are really just casting judgment about how other people speak. Much of which seems to be regional manners of speaking. I wouldn't change how Southerners speak for the world; nor Northerners, nor Mid Westerners, etc. Our colloquialism is what makes us unique. Imagine if we all sounded the same? How boring that would be.

The topic of Decluttering Speech is a fabulous topic. To declutter your speech involves real effort -- it involves being completely present, completely aware of *exactly* what is coming out of your mouth at the moment you are speaking. This is no small feat.

Rather than pass judgments on how others speak the English language, perhaps it would be more helpful to learn ways in which readers are paying attention to, and decluttering, their own speech. I, for one, use and abuse the word "like." Not as bad as some teenagers I've heard, but enough to make me cringe sometimes when I hear it repeatedly come out of my mouth. I am working to be aware of when I use it, and to stop myself before I say it.

I've found when I keep my attention on my own words and actions, things I have little control over -- such as how people speak, or dress, or act -- don't bother me nearly as much.
Dear L. Baker Brown

You have taken issue with input on speech clutter. I used to pronounce the word "legacy" as "leegacy" because it sounds better. When corrected, I did not have any qualms about changing the way I said it; all I did was to consult the dictionary, which I do on a routine basis. You see, while working for NCNB National Bank in the 80's, we took a course in correcting English grammar. There was a section entitled :"Speech Blots." The course made total sense. The way people speak very often is a learned habit out of environment in the home or "subculture." "I ain't long been gone" is a gross misuse of the principles that were students listenings, they would rid themselves of these habits and set examples to others. Thanks for your comments, but I hope that you can judge my intentions better, as being those of educational purposes.

L. Baker Brown said:
I never comment on these sorts of forums, but for some reason, this post really bothered me. I was directed to this site by a friend; I watched Gail's intro video and she seems inspiring and great -- I'm thinking maybe I'll check out her book. And then I click on some of the threads, which also seem thoughtful and inspiring... until I came across this one.

Gladys' "pet peeve" and the others who have chimed in with their own language pet peeves, are really just casting judgment about how other people speak. Much of which seems to be regional manners of speaking. I wouldn't change how Southerners speak for the world; nor Northerners, nor Mid Westerners, etc. Our colloquialism is what makes us unique. Imagine if we all sounded the same? How boring that would be.

The topic of Decluttering Speech is a fabulous topic. To declutter your speech involves real effort -- it involves being completely present, completely aware of *exactly* what is coming out of your mouth at the moment you are speaking. This is no small feat.

Rather than pass judgments on how others speak the English language, perhaps it would be more helpful to learn ways in which readers are paying attention to, and decluttering, their own speech. I, for one, use and abuse the word "like." Not as bad as some teenagers I've heard, but enough to make me cringe sometimes when I hear it repeatedly come out of my mouth. I am working to be aware of when I use it, and to stop myself before I say it.

I've found when I keep my attention on my own words and actions, things I have little control over -- such as how people speak, or dress, or act -- don't bother me nearly as much.
Since hamburger IS meat, that would be clutter.

Katie Zee said:
I understand the pet peeve - - how about this one? Hot Water Heater.
And does Hamburger Meat qualify? :-)
Hey, Gladys, I really understand your obsession. Try living in a foreign country where you have to rearrange most of the sentence simply to have a conversation!"

What I've had to do is make up ways to cope, so, I've made the detecting extra words into a game and just note the extras silently and go about my business, knowing that I'm working on maintaining my own English and not that of others, it's too big a task.

Try it. It's fun and less stressful and your English improves at the same time. Talk about a win-win situation!

Reina J.
Dear Reina
Thanks for your idea. I have written down out of place words or phrases in a notebook, and this helped for a time. I find that if I do not somehow stay on top of the errors, they somehow "Creep in" to my own vernacular. Some of the people are my closest associates. I like the idea of making it into a game. Write again!

Reina Rhodes said:
Hey, Gladys, I really understand your obsession. Try living in a foreign country where you have to rearrange most of the sentence simply to have a conversation!"

What I've had to do is make up ways to cope, so, I've made the detecting extra words into a game and just note the extras silently and go about my business, knowing that I'm working on maintaining my own English and not that of others, it's too big a task.

Try it. It's fun and less stressful and your English improves at the same time. Talk about a win-win situation!

Reina J.
Although, since Hamburgers have other ingredients than meat, as a chef, I say it is NOT clutter! It is the meat of the hamburger that is blended with binders and flavors, grilled and placed on a hamburger bun, that brings us that glorius cookout favorite!

gladys louise "paige" premo said:
Since hamburger IS meat, that would be clutter.

Katie Zee said:
I understand the pet peeve - - how about this one? Hot Water Heater.
And does Hamburger Meat qualify? :-)

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